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Androgenetic Alopecia in Men

The Male pattern baldness or androgenetic alopecia is the most common form of permanent hair loss. This form of male baldness is for the most part attributable to hereditary factors.


About 1/3of all men between 25 and 40 suffer from hair loss.

Male baldness generally starts with a receding hairline at the temples as well as in the middle of the scalp. It then progresses until all that remains is a horseshoe shaped fringe of hair, sometimes it referred to as a “tonsure”.


A factor contributing to baldness is the so-called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT for short. This is produced with the help of the enzyme 5α-reductase out of the male testosterone hormone. The hair on top of men’s heads is particularly sensitive to this hormone. The growth phase of individual hairs becomes shorter, with hair falling out prematurely.








Male pattern baldness is
the most common form
of permanent hair loss

Alopecia Areata

Patches can be anywhere on the scalp and multiple, with a diameter of 2.5 – 5 cm. Hair can regrow in one patch, while again falling out in another patch.


In most people suffering from alopecia areata, hair is lost in certain patches, only to grow again 1 – 2 years later.


Alopecia areata totalis results in the scalp losing all its hair. However only a small percentage of all hair loss patients suffer from this form of baldness. In most cases, hair loss is restricted to the head.

It is an autoimmune
codition which
causes patchy
hairloss, it can result
in a single bald patch
or extensive
patchy hair loss.
It is an autoimmune codition which causes patchy hairloss, it can result in a single bald patch or extensive patchy hair loss.

THE

NORWOOD SCALE

If you start to thin or recede early in life, there’s a good chance you’re destined to lose quite a bit of hair.


The Norwood Scale is a set of images that depict the different stages of male pattern hair loss. Now, whether they try to avoid the situation or not, most men know what to expect when they see the early signs of hair loss, so what’s the use of such a diagram that only states the obvious?


STAGE 1



Healthy hair
Therefore no need
for treatment.

STAGE 2.
INSIGNIFICANT
HAIR LOSS AT
THE TEMPLES

STAGE 3.
THE FIRST
STAGE THAT
REQUIRES
TREATMENT
STAGE 2



Initial signs of baldness
are becoming evident

STAGE 3



Represents the lowest
extent of hair loss considered
sufficient to be called baldness.

Well, the rate at which men lose hair varies enormously. Male hair loss can begin as early as puberty and while some men may shed rapidly in their 20’s up to a Type 3 or Type 4, others may have no detectable amount of hair loss until they are in their 50’s, only to advance to a Type 6 or Type 7 in just a few short years.

Essentially, the scale is used to assess how advanced a man’s hair loss is – the higher the number, the more advanced the loss.

WHEN VIEWED
FROM ABOVE,
STAGES 5 TO 7
SHOW THE
REMAINING HAIR
AT THE SIDES
AND BACK AS
A DISTINCT
HORSESHOE
SHAPE.
STAGE 4



There is a decisive lack
of hair on the Crown

STAGE 5



The band of hair extending
across the crown is noticeably
narrower and thinner.

STAGE 6



The bridge of hair that once
crossed the crown is now
been lost with only sparse
hair remaining.

STAGE 7



This is the most advanced
or severe form of hair
loss. Only a narrow
band of hair in a horseshoe
shape survives on the
sides and back of the scalp.

THE NORWOOD SCALE

If you start to thin or recede early in life, there’s a good chance you’re destined to lose quite a bit of hair.

The Norwood Scale is a set of images that depict the different stages of male pattern hair loss. Now, whether they try to avoid the situation or not, most men know what to expect when they see the early signs of hair loss, so what’s the use of such a diagram that only states the obvious?

STAGE 1

Healthy hair Therefore no need for treatment.

STAGE 2

Initial signs of baldness are becoming evident

STAGE 3

Represents the lowest extent of hair loss considered sufficient to be called baldness.

STAGE 4

There is a decisive lack of hair on the Crown.

STAGE 5

The band of hair extending across the crown is noticeably narrower and thinner.

STAGE 6

The bridge of hair that once crossed the crown is now been lost with only sparse hair remaining.

STAGE 7

This is the most advanced or severe form of hair loss. Only a narrow band of hair in a horseshoe shape survives on the sides and back of the scalp.

Well, the rate at which men lose hair varies enormously.

Male hair loss can begin as early as puberty and while some men may shed rapidly in their 20’s up to a Type 3 or Type 4, others may have no detectable amount of hair loss until they are in their 50’s, only to advance to a Type 6 or Type 7 in just a few short years.